Author Archives: Jennifer Kellner

New Dietary Guidelines

New dietary guidelines were unveiled recently that called on Americans to cut down on meat, salt, and sweets. The new guidelines recommend consuming less than 10 percent of one’s daily calories from added sugar—including that found in seemingly healthy foods, such as yogurt. Limiting saturated fat was also recommended—a chief source is meat. Eating less meat is associated with reduced cases of heart disease and stroke, the report said. The report also singled out teenage boys and adult men as eating excessive meat and other proteins, and said they “need to reduce overall intake of protein foods by decreasing intakes of meats, poultry, and eggs and increasing amounts of vegetables or other under consumed food groups.”

But for many people, the report said, eggs are a good source of nutrition, and not as big a worry on cholesterol as previously believed. Americans are also advised to eat more fruits and vegetables and work out more. The recommendation on sodium is now 2,300 milligrams per day for healthy adults and 1,500 milligrams per day for those with high blood pressure or those in danger of developing high blood pressure. The number of Americans at risk of developing high blood pressure has increased over the past five years. Now, two-thirds of the population is at risk. Back in 2010, only half the population was at risk. The increase in people with high blood pressure is another reason to “know your numbers.” Everyone is encouraged to stop by the RCH lobby between 7-10:00 a.m. February 15-19, 2016 for free blood pressure screenings.

Source: American Heart Association

Coach’s Corner

Leslie Dredge-Murphy
Advice from Leslie Dredge-Murphy, Health Coach at the Mt. Ayr Medical Clinic

It’s a new year, why not try on a new attitude? Since it’s February, let’s focus on loving your life and yourself! Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Create a “positive” or “grateful” journal and try to capture at least three things each day.
  • Volunteer! When you’re helping others and giving back you feel great. The more you give, the better you feel!
  • Challenge yourself by setting a goal. Achieving goals can boost your confidence and make you feel more in control of your life.
  • Set aside some “Me Time.” Do things you truly enjoy, just because. Whether it’s reading, going to a movie, spending time with a best friend, or taking a walk, recharge yourself with some time spent on you!

Don’t miss FREE Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Screenings
7:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
Monday–Friday
February 15–19
RCH Lobby

Feeling Better Than Ever

2016 George Haidsiak

Cardiac rehab helped George get back to work

For George Haidsiak, the “new normal” is actually better than ever. “I feel wonderful!” he reported on a cold day in January. His story begins when he experienced chest pains and was rushed to the hospital. “They did an enzyme test, and sure enough, I’d had a heart attack,” he explained. “They took me to Des Moines to see a heart specialist. Luckily, it was a very small obstruction that affected only about 10% of my heart. After trying to do an angiogram, which didn’t work, I was told that I could go back to my normal activities.”
A lifelong farmer, currently managing about 90 head of cattle, George has been active all his life. But like anyone in his 60s, over time he had begun to “take the easier roads when doing things.” His “normal activities” included plenty of physical labor, but not necessarily constant work for extended lengths of time. When Jennifer England from Ringgold County Hospital’s cardiac rehab department contacted him, he was skeptical at first. “The doctors had cleared me for normal activity, so I didn’t think I needed rehab. But I agreed to come in and talk to her. I thought it sounded very interesting so I decided to start the program.”
George’s rehab focused on exercise and nutrition education. He began with 2 ½ miles per hour walks on a treadmill for about 20 minutes. Along with the walking he did stretching and weight lifting and other muscle-building exercises. By the time he finished his 16-week program he was up to 3 miles per hour for at least 40 minutes. “I could really feel the difference,” he said. “As it got more strenuous, I kept
improving.” He’s continued the exercise program at home. “When I’m doing chores and working on the farm I don’t get tired or winded like I used to.”

After four months of cardiac rehab, George doesn't tire as easily

After four months of cardiac rehab, George doesn’t tire as easily

Because of his overall health and the condition of his heart, cardiac rehab was recommended, but not mandatory for George. It was the convenience of Ringgold County Hospital and the quality of the staff that made the difference for him. “If they’d wanted me to do rehab in Des Moines, I just wouldn’t have done it,” he said. “It’s a two-hour drive and not economically feasible. But this worked out perfectly for me. Jennifer was superb.”
George’s “new normal” really is better than ever. “I feel wonderful. It’s been worth it. Whenever someone asks me how I’m feeling I tell them I’m doing great. I’ve never had another chest pain. I am very lucky.”
For more information on Ringgold County Hospital cardiac rehab program, contact Jennifer England at 641-464-3226.

Print this story

FREE Blood Pressure & Cholesterol Screenings

BloodPressure_IMG_8935Ringgold County Hospital (RCH) recognizes the importance of knowing and understanding your numbers. People have no way of knowing they have high cholesterol or high blood pressure without being tested. We encourage you to learn more about cholesterol, blood pressure, and heart health.

Free blood pressure and cholesterol screenings are being conducted at Ringgold County Hospital February 15-19 from 7:00 – 10:00 a.m. on a first-come, first-serve basis. You must be fasting to take part in these screenings. Your results will be sent directly to you and we encourage you to share a copy of your results with your primary health care practitioner.

Make 2016 a Great Year

2016ClinicStaff

The Mt. Ayr Medical Clinic is your partner in good health.

Did you make some New Year’s resolutions? Maybe you promised your children that you really are going to quit smoking. Perhaps it was a commitment to your wife that you will eat more vegetables and drop 20 pounds. Or it might have been a conversation with yourself to exercise more and lower your blood pressure.

Every January, many of us make resolutions big and small, and then often struggle to keep them. The great news is that you’re not alone! The staff at the Mt. Ayr Medical Clinic is ready to partner with you to help you reach your goals. Practitioners in the MAMC provide care to all ages.

To kick off 2016, we asked some of the clinic staff to provide their favorite tips for a healthy and happy year:
  • DO wash your hands; wash your hands; wash your hands!
  • DO take breaks during the work day. Get up and move around. Go outside and get some fresh air or stay inside and walk the hallways!
  • DO get up and workout in the morning before your brain has time to realize what it is doing!
  • DO replace your French fries with a side salad or vegetable when dining out.
  • DO make the decision to take control of your health care. Start with knowing your numbers and why they are important.
  • DON’T smoke or use tobacco. Many preventable illnesses are linked to smoking. Tobacco is linked to nearly 1 in 5 deaths in the United States.
  • DO limit alcohol to no more than two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women.
  • DO eat healthy. Include four to five cups of fruits and vegetables per day. Eat whole-grain, high-fiber foods. There is no “magic pill or diet.” Eat breakfast and don’t skip meals. Aim for 8 glasses of water per day.
  • DO lose weight if you’re overweight. A high-fiber, low-fat diet and regular exercise can help you lose weight and keep it off.
  • DO exercise. It can help prevent heart disease, high blood pressure, osteoporosis and depression. Try to exercise for 30-60 minutes 4-6 times per week.
  • DON’T use tanning booths. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the US. Wear SPF 30 or higher sunscreen, wear protective clothing and hats when outside and limit sun exposure.
  • DO keep your immunizations up to date. Check with your medical provider to review your records.
  • DO make time for yearly health screening appointments. Visit with your physician at least once per year to maintain your optimal health and well being and make sure you are actively preventing disease.
  • DO take charge of your life. Health is a state of mind and body. When you experience improved physical health, you will gain energy and a positive outlook on your life. Set small goals that are easy to add to your daily routine.

Print Health Tips

Find a Doctor

Get News by Email

Nominate Here