Category Archives: Health Tips

Ready, Set, Back to School!

As we approach the end of August, many parents are preparing for another school year for their children. The beginning of school is a perfect time to set the stage for the upcoming year and to create new healthy habits for the entire family. Below are simple tips to get you going on the right foot.

Start the day off right.
Eating breakfast as a family is a perfect time to bond and spend quality time together while also preparing a healthy breakfast. Eggs with whole grain toast, fruit and yogurt, or whole grain unsweetened cereal with milk and berries are several great choices. Beginning the day with a meal consisting of protein and fiber, a winning combination of nutrients, will help the entire family feel satisfied until lunch.

Nix the added sugar.
The American Heart Association suggests that children and teens ages 2-18 limit added sugar to no more than 6 teaspoons (or approximately 25 grams) per day. Kids who eat foods high in added sugars tend to eat fewer healthy foods. Added sugar provides no nutritional benefits and is found in a wide range of food from cookies, ketchup, salad dressings, sugar sweetened cereals, smoothies, to sweetened yogurts. The major culprit of added sugar, however, is soda and sugary drinks including iced tea and fruit punch. Sugary drinks, often called “liquid calories,” provide no health benefits.

Swap juice for whole fruit.
Feed children whole fruit instead of juice. The fruit is rich in fiber and its high-water content helps keep the calories low. It’s easy to guzzle down too many calories from juice without even realizing it. A pint of orange juice, for example, contains around 225 calories. This is the equivalent to 2-3 cups of mixed berries. Most people wouldn’t think twice about drinking the pint of juice but few would eat three cups of berries in one sitting.

Pack a healthy snack.
If you are packing snacks, it’s a perfect opportunity to include at least one fruit and veggie. Smart snacks include fresh fruit, Greek yogurt, baby carrots with hummus, roasted edamame, and of course a bottle of water. Nuts or nut butter squeeze packs are also great choices if a school allows nuts; if not, they are a great go-to snack when kids get home.

Skip the white food (unless it’s cauliflower or white beans).
White bread including bagels, white rice, and white pasta are refined grains and are easy to overeat. Because they contain virtually no fiber, we don’t feel satisfied after eating them. Introducing kids to healthier alternatives including quinoa, whole grain pasta, and brown rice helps them get into the habit of enjoying these grains. No need to cut out starch entirely. Choosing the healthier ones is a far better alternative.

Traveling to and From School Safely

Before school starts, review the basic rules with your children and practice any new routes or modes of transportation.

School Bus
• Children should always board and exit the bus at locations that provide safe access to the bus or to the school building.
• Remind your child to wait for the bus to stop before approaching it from the curb.
• Make sure your child walks where she can see the bus driver (which means the driver will be able to see her, too).
• Remind your student to look both ways to see that no other traffic is coming before crossing the street.

Bike
• Practice the bike route to school before the first day of school to make sure your child can manage it.
• Children should always wear a bicycle helmet, no matter how short or long the ride.
• Teach them to ride on the right, in the same direction as auto traffic.
• Respect traffic lights and stop signs.
• Know the “rules of the road.”

Fireworks Safety Tips

With the recent legalization of fireworks sales in the state of Iowa, it’s important to remember to handle them carefully. For your safety, obey all local laws regarding the use of fireworks.

• Know your fireworks; read the cautionary labels and performance descriptions before igniting.
• A responsible adult should supervise all firework activities. Never give fireworks to children.
• Alcohol and fireworks do not mix. Save your alcohol for after the show.
• Wear safety glasses when shooting fireworks.
• Light one firework at a time and then quickly move away.
• Use fireworks outdoors in a clear area; away from buildings and vehicles.
• Never relight a “dud” firework. Wait 20 minutes and then soak it in a bucket of water.
• Always have a bucket of water and charged water hose nearby.
• Never carry fireworks in your pocket or shoot them into metal or glass containers.
• Do not experiment with homemade fireworks.
• Dispose of spent fireworks by wetting them down and place in a metal trash can away from any building or combustible materials until the next day.
• FAA regulations prohibit the possession and transportation of fireworks in your checked baggage or carry-on luggage.
• Report illegal explosives, like M-80s and quarter sticks, to the fire or police department.
• Don’t bring your pets to a fireworks display, even a small one.
• If fireworks are being used near your home, put your pet in a safe, interior room to avoid exposure to the sound.
• Make sure your pet has an identification tag, in case it runs off during a fireworks display.
• Never shoot fireworks of any kind (consumer fireworks, sparklers, fountains, etc.) near pets.

For more information, visit Safe Kids Worldwide and the National Safety Council.

Help Prevent Falls

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May is Older Americans Month Each year, millions of older people—those 65 and older—fall. In fact, more than one out of four older people falls each year, but less than half tell their doctor. If you, or a loved one, are over the age of 65, there are some simple things you can do to prevent falling and becoming injured.

Make Your Home Safer
• Get rid of things you could trip over.
• Add grab bars inside and outside your tub or shower and next to the toilet.
• Put railings on both sides of stairs.
• Make sure your home has lots of light by adding more or brighter light bulbs.

Talk to Your Healthcare Providers
• Ask your healthcare provider in the Physical Therapy department at Ringgold County Hospital to evaluate your risk for falling and talk with them about specific things you can do. They may recommend that you do exercises that make your legs stronger and improve your balance.

Here for Your Emergencies

Call 911 when you need emergency medical assistance

The Mount Ayr Medical Clinic is open five days a week for non-emergency medical care. Ringgold County Hospital’s Emergency Room is open 24/7 for emergency medical conditions such as:

  • Immediate onset of symptoms, including severe pain
  • Suspected heart attack or stroke
  • Reasonable belief that immediate medical attention is necessary to avoid damage to organs or your health
  • Sudden or extreme difficulty breathing
  • Sudden or extended loss of consciousness
  • Bleeding that will not stop
  • Major burns

Other serious conditions could be considered emergencies if they require immediate treatment to prevent serious complications. Examples include
deep cuts, broken bones, chest pain, seizures, and suspected poisoning. Sudden onset of severe headache or abdominal pain, as well as shortness of breath, may also be considered emergencies.

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