RCH Newsletter July 2016 WaterWe know it’s important to get kids to eat healthy foods, but what about getting them on board with healthy drinks? What kids drink can greatly affect how many calories they consume and the amount of calcium (needed to build strong bones) their bodies get.

Serve Water and Milk
For kids of all ages, water and milk are the best choices. Besides having zero calories, water is a no-sugar thirst-quencher. Plus 1 cup of milk has 300 milligrams of calcium, so it’s a big contributor to a child’s daily
calcium needs. Choose fat-free (skim) or low-fat (1%) milk products most of the time. Children ages 1-2 need whole milk.

Here’s how much calcium kids need each day:
• Toddlers (ages 1 to 3 years): 700 milligrams of calcium daily
• Kids (ages 4 to 8 years): 1000 milligrams
• Older kids (ages 9 to 18 years): 1,300 milligrams

The current dietary guidelines for milk or equivalent dairy products or fortified soy beverages are:
• Kids ages 2 to 3 should drink 2 cups every day.
• Kids 4 through 8 should have 2½ cups per day.
• Kids 9 and older should have 3 cups per day.
Juice should not be given to infants younger than 6 months old. After that, serve only 100% fruit juice and limit it to 4 to 6 ounces per day. Try to choose juice without added sugar such as corn syrup. When kids
drink too much juice, juice drinks, sports drinks, and soda, these beverages can crowd out other nutrient sources they need. Sugary drinks can also pile on the calories.

Brad Wilson, D.O.

Brad Wilson, D.O.

Childhood Obesity and Diabetes
5:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 27 in the Hospital Cafeteria

Join Dr. Brad Wilson for a free educational seminar to learn more about the causes of obesity and diabetes in children. The program is free, and a light dinner will be served. Call 641-464-4401 by September 23 to reserve your place.